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  • Castellers


    One of Catalonia’s most famous traditions is that of the “castells” (castles), which are human towers that are lifted by building different levels of people until reaching insane heights that can go up to ten stories. There is no mechanical help, and tens and even hundreds of people can take part in it. The “castellers” are the people who carry out this activity, which is over 200 years old.
    Acknowledged as Immaterial Cultural Heritage by Unesco, his origin is believed to be around the area of Tarragona, Catalonia’s second most important province after Barcelona. During the 20th Century this practice spread all over Catalonia. The “castellers” are grouped in “colles” that normally take the name of its place of origin.

  • Children's activities at Poble Espanyol

    Children's activities at Poble Espanyol

    A large area, totally free of traffic, with different places to explore, most of them in the open air. That’s the Poble Espanyol de Barcelona, an iconic visitor attraction in the heart of Montjuïc. Every Sunday, there’s a different activity: theatre, dance, music, magic, treasure hunts, etc. Throughout the year there are loads of activities to ensure you have a great day out with the family: Carnival, a Giants’ Parade, a Puppet Festival, the Click and Go Fair, the Main Festival, the Medieval Fair, Christmas at the Poble, Halloween... and new additions, including a fantastic flower festival and Midsummer Eve party tailored to all the family. In short, a wide range of activities for all the family.

  • Visits to rehearsals of

    Visits to rehearsals of "Castelles"

    Seeing them rehearse and, most of all, joining in, is a thrilling experience! The human towers – castells – are one of the most authentic and unique cultural manifestations in Europe and consist of the building of human towers up to nine and ten tiers high.
    Castells have been awarded World Heritage status by Unesco and are part of Catalan cultural identity while conveying values of social cohesion, solidarity and personal betterment.

    Do you want to find out about these everyday people who are able to do extraordinary things? Do you want to find out first hand what it means to be a casteller?
    You'll be able to see a rehearsal and find out about the world of castellers accompanied by a member of the team. If you wish, you will also be able to join the pinya (base tier) of a tower.

  • Grec Festival de Barcelona

    Grec Festival de Barcelona

    For many Barcelona culture lovers, summer means one thing: the Grec Festival, a wide-ranging arts event that sees the city through one of the hottest months of the year and into its traditional holiday period. Theatre, dance, music, circus and children's activities fill Barcelona's venues, although it is the iconic Teatre Grec that not only gives the festival its name but also provides the location for some of the most atmospheric performances.

  • Easter in Barcelona

    Easter in Barcelona

    Taking place between the months of March and April, and coinciding with the first full moon of spring, Easter is one of the most important festivals for the Christian faith.
    To celebrate this festival, Barcelona is full of events and processions that depict the stages of Christ's life and recall his final moments: the passion, death and resurrection.

  • Language


    There are two official languages in Catalonia: Catalan and Spanish, and there are more and more people in the region who understand and speak English. You’re sure to get by.

  • Tarragona

    Tarragona city, the capital of the Costa Daurada, is a city that grew out of the sea. 92 km south of Barcelona, showcases a roman legacy which has been declared a World Heritage Site by Unesco

  • Our wines

  • Wines with their own unique character

    Wines with their own unique character

  • The sacred principles of

    The sacred principles of "pa amb tomàquet"

    If you ask any Barcelona local to name the best Catalan invention of all time, nine out of ten will probably reply "el pa amb tomàquet!" (bread rubbed with tomato). More than a simple recipe, culinary technique or custom, the gesture of rubbing tomato on a piece of bread is a sign of Catalan identity.

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